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Tether Tools unveils TetherPro line of USB-C cables

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Tether Tools, a manufacturer of wired and wireless equipment for camera tethering, has introduced its line of TetherPro USB-C cables for photographers shooting tethered with cameras or computers that feature a USB-C connection.

With faster data-transfer rates and the ability to insert connectors in any direction, USB-C is a great improvement over previous versions of the USB-standard. However, the variety of existing cables and connectors means that photographers using USB-C cameras or laptops often have to revert to using adapters, hubs or dongles to connect devices.

The TetherPro line has been designed to eliminate the need for all those adapter solutions. It features 12 cables, all available in either black or orange and purely intended for data transfer—meaning they are not suitable for powering USB-C devices. Tether Tools says its cables are constructed to the highest possible USB specifications, allowing for fast and reliable data transfer.

“Our goal is to provide photographers with the optimal cable to meet their unique needs for tethered photography, without the use of dongles, whether they have a USB-C port on their camera, computer, or both,” said Josh Simons, Tether Tools CEO. “We've worked diligently to optimize the performance and are excited to bring TetherPro USB-C cables to the market after extensive development and testing.”

The line includes USB-C to USB-C versions and USB-C to USB-A cables for those using USB-C Cameras, such as the Hasselblad H6 or X series, Panasonic GH5 or Sony a7R III. There are also TetherPro USB-C cables for photographers using USB-C computers with USB 2.0 or 3.0 cameras. And if you'd like a longer cable, the 15-foot USB-C to USB-A adapter might be worth a closer look.

All of the cables all retail for between $25 and $57 depending on configuration and length. For more information or specific pricing, visit the Tether Tools website.

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freeAgent
6 hours ago
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These cables cost at least $25 and don't support power delivery??? I guess Tether Tools is the Monster Cable of the photography industry.
Los Angeles, CA
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Nutritional Yeast is Awesome!

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Nutritional Yeast on Popcorn: Credit Matt Herndon

Back when I was in high school, my brother went vegan and a bunch of weird ingredients started showing up in our house. As a huge meat lover I turned my nose up at most of this stuff, even made fun of it, but nutritional yeast immediately caught my taste buds. Decades later, my brother is back to eating meat and I have become vegetarian, but we both still love nutritional yeast. Now, new research shows that in addition to providing a healthy shot of protein and vitamins, nutritional yeast can actually make you less sick (or in a small number of cases more sick).

Want to know more? Read on!

What is Nutritional Yeast?

Nutritional yeast is basically dead baking yeast with some extra vitamins. Vegans love nutritional yeast because it is fortified with B12 vitamins that are normally only found from animal derived foods (B12 in nutritional yeast actually gets made by bacteria and then mixed with yeast to make it fortified). If you don’t care about B12, you can actually make your own non-fortified nutritional yeast by just toasting baking yeast. I recommend buying fortified nutritional yeast over cooking your own as the flakey texture is better and it doesn’t cost that much more.

As the name states, nutritional yeast is also packed with nutrition. The exact amounts depend on the maker but 1.5 tablespoons of Red Star nutritional yeast has 70 calories, 8g of protein, 1g of fat, and 6g of carbohydrates (4 of which are fiber) along with more than enough B1, B2, B3, B6, and B12 vitamins for a day and a bit of potassium and iron. That is a pretty awesome nutrition profile for a food, but beyond that it may also help keep you from getting sick.

How Nutritional Yeast Can Prevent Sickness

I have been eating nutritional yeast for years because it tastes good and is full of protein. Recently I learned that it has even more positive benefits. A new study found that, over the course of 12 weeks, 85% of children given a placebo got sick, while only 40% of children given a small amount of nutritional yeast (either 1/8th teaspoon or 1/16th teaspoon daily) got sick. That is a huge result! The study had a relatively small sample size (only 156 kids) and should be repeated on additional populations, but the results are very encouraging. The nutritional yeast I’ve been using to season my son’s food is likely helping him avoid sick days too. If you want a more thorough synthesis of this and other studies, watch this video.

If you don’t have kids, don’t worry, nutritional yeast has also been shown to reduce sickness in adults. In this case the study was done on extreme athletes and it used a glucan tablet instead of actual yeast (yeast has a ton of glucan), but the results still showed a 50% reduction in symptoms. I would spend $7 on a container of nutritional yeast before I’d drop nearly $50 for a bottle of Wellmune pills though.

The Dark Side of Nutritional Yeast

Nutritional yeast isn’t all butterflies and rainbows; it has a dark side, too.

First off, some nutritional yeasts can have elevated levels of lead. This leads to some bottles having a Prop 65 warning. Fortunately, there are many manufacturers who produce yeast with lead levels so low they can’t even be detected. Here’s an independent test that found Bragg, Bob’s Red Mill, and Red Star (three of the biggest brands) all had indetectable levels of lead. On the flip side, Frontier Coop, KAL, and Whole Foods brands all had detectable lead, but you’d need to be eating over 6 tablespoons a day of each to exceed your max allowable dose level and even a yeast lover like myself doesn’t eat that much of the stuff.

The other problem with nutritional yeast is that it can actually exacerbate a few diseases in some people. Studies have found evidence that consuming yeast can make certain diseases, like Crohn’s and hidradentis suppurative, worse. This isn’t just nutritional yeast, though; it is all yeasts: yeast in bread, in beer, in wine, etc. While learning about this, I started to wonder if part of the whole anti-gluten movement is coming from people who are actually sensitive to yeast and end up incidentally cutting it out as part of cutting out gluten.1 In the end, only a small fraction of the population is sensitive to yeast.  If you come down with one of these serious diseases, you should try completely cutting yeast from your diet and seeing if there are some positive effects (you should probably also try cutting dairy as well, but that’s a topic for another post).

How to Eat It

Okay, now on to the fun part. I’ve been going on an on about how healthy nutritional yeast is, but have spent far too little time discussing how incredibly tasty it can be.

The simplest way to eat nutritional yeast is to just sprinkle it on any food you might sprinkle cheese powder on (e.g. soups, pasta, casseroles). My personal favorite is to sprinkle nutritional yeast on popcorn along with some garlic powder and salt and a little olive oil to help it all stick. This is so dang simple and so good for you (popcorn is a whole grain stuffed with antioxidants) that you could eat it every day. If you really want to be a health nut, you can cut out the olive oil and salt. Even with just a little salt and oil I think this has better flavor than popcorn covered in traditional butter and salt. I would pick this snack even if it weren’t so healthy.

Another great way to use nutritional yeast is in faux cheese sauces. My wife and I have made this cashew queso a number of times and actually like it better than real queso. The umami that it has is just amazing, and unlike regular queso it is actually good for you (I’d still be eating it even if it weren’t, though). Another option is sunflower mac. I won’t sit here and lie to you by saying that this tastes better than regular mac and cheese. It has its own sort of flavor that is good but not ridiculously decadent. Even better, the nutritional content of sunflower mac completely trounces that of regular mac and cheese. You could eat it every day for a decade and end up healthier than you were when you started. The same cannot be said of regular mac and cheese.

If you’re looking for a high protein meal with a lot of nutrition, you can try seitan. Seitan is a high protein meat replacer, and in my opinion it has better texture and flavor than tofu or tempeh (it also has no soy if you’re an anti-soy person). It is made from mixing wheat gluten with nutritional yeast and other flavorings. Here’s a great recipe for seitan (protip: reuse the simmering broth for something else later). Once you’ve made seitan you can cube it for stir-fries, throw it on the grill with BBQ sauce, slice it thin for sandwiches, etc. You can also buy premade seitan in the store, but it is pricey and you don’t get to customize the flavor. You can make 4-5 lbs of seitan (which has more protein than 10 lbs of chicken) for around $20 with a $15 4 lb bag of vital wheat gluten and a $7 4.5 oz jar of Bragg nutritional yeast. The seitan won’t even require the entire jar of yeast so you’ll have plenty left for popcorn and cashew cream sauces. Heck, you could even throw a few seitan chunks in with your sunflower mac to make it even better.

Nutritional Yeast: The Real Superfood

I think the term “superfood” gets thrown around far too often these days. If there is one food that truly deserves the title, it is nutritional yeast. It packs a ton of protein, fiber and vitamins into a tiny package. It keeps you from getting sick. It tastes amazingly good. What else could you ask for in a food?

Nutritional yeast is just plain awesome. Now get out there and start eating some!

The post Nutritional Yeast is Awesome! appeared first on Rampant Discourse.

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freeAgent
6 hours ago
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Hmmm, the popcorn idea sounds interesting.
Los Angeles, CA
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Google and Coursera launch program to train more IT support specialists

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 After a big fundraise and subsequent reorganization last year at Coursera — which saw a change of CEO, as well as the departure of its COO, CFO, CMO and CPO (along with some 40 others) — the online education startup is today launching a new IT course with Google to underscore its message that the ship is still sailing as it passes 30 million users and 2,500 courses. Today, the… Read More



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freeAgent
22 hours ago
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InSpectre: See whether your PC's protected from Meltdown and Spectre

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If you’re wondering whether your computer is susceptible to the latest bête noir, Meltdown and Spectre, you can take the official Microsoft patch and, after a suitable amount of technical drudgery, come away with a result that doesn’t answer much. Or you can try Steve Gibson’s new InSpectre and – with suitable caveats – see some meaningful results and a few hints about catching up.

Microsoft has a complex PowerShell script that details your machine’s exposure to the Meltdown and Spectre security flaws. Running that script on all but the simplest and most up-to-date systems turns into a hair-pulling exercise, and the results are coated in 10 layers of technical gobbledygook.

To read this article in full, please click here

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freeAgent
22 hours ago
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Brave browser begins million-dollar token giveaway - CNET

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You won't get more than about $5 worth of tokens, but the browser maker hopes you'll help improve online advertising privacy.
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freeAgent
22 hours ago
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Good blockchain.
Los Angeles, CA
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Telegram plans to spend more than $100 million of its mega-ICO on salaries, offices, and consultants

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Founder and CEO of Telegram Pavel Durov delivers a keynote speech during the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona

The chat app Telegram hopes to raise up to $1.2 billion in an initial coin offering (ICO), according to Business Insider. This would make it the largest one-off fundraising using the cryptocurrency-based mechanism to date.

What will Telegram do with the money? According to documents outlining the ICO seen by Quartz, Telegram plans to spend $620 million over the next four years on the development of the chat app and related costs. More specifically, it plans to devote around $500 million to things like equipment, bandwidth, co-location (paying for space in a data center), and user-verification costs. The app plans to reach 200 million monthly users this year, and 1 billion by 2022, according to the documents.

The rest of Telegram’s ICO-fueled budget, or around $120 million, will be spent on wages, offices, and legal and consulting fees. The company employs a team of just 15 developers, according to the document. As one prospective investor, who did not want to be named, told Quartz: That’s enough for a lot of Lambos, and maybe a couple of Gulfstreams. (Quartz contacted Telegram to verify the documents, but has not yet received a reply.)

Here’s Telegram’s past and future budget, according to the ICO document:

Some context: In 2016, Facebook spent $3.8 billion (pdf) on salaries, servers, energy expenses and other items it reports as “cost of revenue” that are similar in nature to Telegram’s spending plans. It also spent $5.9 billion on research and development that year.

The TON token is expected to launch in the fourth quarter of this year. Telegram has an ambitious plan, laden with crypto jargon, to use the token for decentralized storage, payments, and domain names. As TechCrunch puts it, it’s an attempt to build a decentralized internet, a goal shared by more established crypto protocols like ethereum. (Ethereum raised a relatively paltry $18 million worth of bitcoin for its 2014 launch.) Top-tier venture capital firms in Silicon Valley are said to be taking large positions in a private sale of TON tokens worth $600 million that ends in February.

Telegram’s plan has also drawn skepticism. One analyst at longstanding cryptoasset firm Pantera Capital called the scheme “$600 Million TONs of Crap” in a Medium post. Among the problems he cites are a lack of technical detail in the offering documents; a reliance on unproven technologies; and the restricted circulation of the technical white paper, impeding investor scrutiny.

Whatever its merits, even if Telegram raises the mammoth amount it’s aiming for, it still wouldn’t be the largest ICO to date. A protocol known as EOS (paywall) has raised $1.3 billion since it started a rolling offering of tokens last June, according to data provider EOS Scan. It releases a tranche of tokens every 23 hours. Now that’s something to chat about.


Read next: Ethereum traders joke about buying “Lambos,” but Lamborghini just reported record sales



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freeAgent
23 hours ago
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Currently, I view companies that engage in ICO fundraising with extreme skepticism. It seems like they do so primarily as a way to separate the new crypto-rich, who tend to be unsophisticated investors, from their money.
Los Angeles, CA
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