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Rep. Eric Swalwell Thinks Gun Confiscation Will Work Out Fine Because Government Has Nukes

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What does it take to get a U.S. House member to (sarcastically! sarcastically, he insists) very publicly threaten to nuke American citizens who want to defend their constitutional rights under the Second Amendment?

Nothing more than pushing back on Twitter against that congressman, Eric Swalwell (D-Calif.)'s proposal from earlier this year to fully ban and buy back every one of what he wants to designate as "assault weapons" with the added bonus of "criminally prosecut[ing] any who choose to defy it."

Apparently feeling a bit threatened by this proposal to go after him and millions of other Americans for possessing an individually owned tool of self-defense and recreation, this was tweeted by a Joe Biggs today:

Rep. Swalwell, willing to make sure the war against any possible American citizen resistance over gun confiscation doesn't fall into the endless quagmire of so many other guerrilla wars of the past century, reminds the citizen that while the government as represented by him wants your guns, it has something far stronger it would be perfectly happy to use if you complain:

Just a little chilling, isn't it, that mafia-like "reminder that we can and will kill you" followed by "thus I'm sure we can talk it out." Swalwell followed up with a bunch of "well, he started it!" posts and insists he was being sarcastic. But that mindset, including its delusional belief that the American military would rather mass murder its own citizens than allow them to continue to enjoy Second Amendment rights as applied to an arbitrary and, as a matter of public policy, rather unimportant set of weapons, reveals why it's so difficult for America's gun owners and those who support their rights to stay calm when politicians talk about their own vision of "common sense gun control."

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freeAgent
15 hours ago
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This is what happens when people discuss politics on Twitter.
Los Angeles, CA
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A Lawsuit Could Decide the Fate of PBR and Other Working Class Beer Brands: New at Reason

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A Wisconsin courtroom was the setting this week for a lawsuit pitting some of the biggest names in watery American beer against each other. The case pits "hipster favorite" Pabst, parent of PBR, against the much larger MillerCoors, which Pabst claims wants "to put it out of business."

Earlier this year, Pabst sued MillerCoors, alleging MillerCoors has engaged in "breach of contract, breach of anti-competition laws, fraud, and misrepresentation." The companies' currently have an agreement in which MillerCoors brews Pabst's beer brands. That agreement is about to end, and MillerCoors seems ambivalent about renewing the contract. Pabst has asked the Wisconsin court to award it $400 million in damages and to force MillerCoors to renew the contract.

Courts shouldn't force parties to renew a contract, writes Baylen Linnekin, even if failure to do so could imperil one party to the contract. But this particular contract could be beside the point. The beer market is changing, and America's megabrewers are in trouble.

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freeAgent
15 hours ago
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Los Angeles, CA
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Windows 10’s email app may soon have ads — unless you speak up now

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Do you use the default Mail client on your PC, the one that comes with Windows 10, to read your email? How would you feel if Microsoft decided to throw in a few ads right at the top of your inbox?

These aren’t rhetorical questions — as Windows news site Aggiornamenti Lumia noticed today, Microsoft is already testing that exact idea in a number of countries around the world. According to Microsoft’s FAQ, what we’re seeing is a pilot program, an experiment, a test that’ll theoretically help the company decide if it should actually roll out the feature for real.

But it’s pretty unusual for a simple A/B test to have such a well thought out plan for getting your dollars: if you want to opt out, Microsoft says it’ll only cost you the typical...

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freeAgent
1 day ago
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I really need a good, professional quality RAW editor that works on Linux. That is the only thing I do on a regular basis that has no good replacement.
Los Angeles, CA
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The kilogram has officially been redefined

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Today, scientists voted to change the definition of the kilogram as well as three other units of measurement -- the ampere, the kelvin and the mole. The vote took place at the General Conference on Weights and Measures in Versailles, France and the n...
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freeAgent
1 day ago
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Cool!
Los Angeles, CA
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Report: Cheaper, disc-free Xbox One option coming next year

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Psht, who needs 'em?

Psht, who needs 'em? (credit: Squirmelia)

Microsoft is planning to release a disc-free version of the Xbox One as early as next Spring, according to an unsourced report from author Brad Sams of Thurrott.com (who has been reliable with early Xbox-related information in the past).

The report suggests the disc-free version of the system would not replace the existing Xbox One hardware, and it would instead represent "the lowest possible price for the Xbox One S console." Sams says that price could come in at $199 "or lower," a significant reduction from the system's current $299 starting price (but not as compelling compared to $199 deals for the Xbox One and PS4 planned for Black Friday this year). Buyers will also be able to add a subscription to the Xbox Games Pass program for as little as $1, according to Sams.

For players that already have games on disc, Sams says Microsoft will offer a "disc to digital" program in association with participating publishers. Players will be able to take their discs into participating retailers (including Microsoft Stores) and trade it in for a "digital entitlement" that can be applied to their Xbox Live account.

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freeAgent
1 day ago
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Los Angeles, CA
mrobold
1 day ago
Remember when Microsoft tried to push this with the original XB1 and gamers lost their collective minds because it was somehow evil?
freeAgent
15 hours ago
Yeah. I doubt we'll see that this time around since most people have gotten used to digital delivery of goods.
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Oops: House Democrats Mistakenly Cast Votes Blocking Resolution on Ending Yemen War

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In a political maneuver that was equal parts bizarre and grimly predictable, Republican leaders on Capitol Hill moved yet again on Wednesday to block a vote to wind down U.S. military support for the war in Yemen, this time by tucking a parliamentary procedure into a rule governing legislation that removes gray wolves from the endangered species list.

The measure narrowly passed with a 201-187 vote, preventing any action on the war in Yemen this legislative session.

What’s more, several of the co-sponsors of the Yemen resolution to end the war either voted to advance the wolf bill or abstained from the vote entirely, meaning that they played a part in preventing their own bill from reaching the House floor.

Adding to the confusion, two of the six House Democrats who joined Republicans in beating back the Yemen bill have told The Intercept that they cast their votes in error.

“Mr. Vela’s vote was actually mistake – we are in the process of changing it,” wrote Mickeala Carter, a spokesperson for Rep. Filemon Vela, D-Texas, who voted for the rule that prevented the Yemen vote.

Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-Calif., is a co-sponsor of the Yemen legislation, which invokes the 1973 War Powers Act to compel the Trump administration to remove U.S. forces from “hostilities” related to the Saudi Arabia-led intervention. Eshoo voted for the measure blocking her own resolution from reaching the floor, a move that puzzled human rights advocates.

“She is a cosponsor of the Resolution and made a mistake on the vote,” wrote Emma Crisci, a spokesperson for Eshoo’s office, in an email to The Intercept. “The Congresswoman is submitting a statement for the Congressional Record saying that she made a mistake in voting and meant to vote NO on the rule.”

Four other House Democrats — Reps. Gene Green and Vicente González of Texas, Collin Peterson of Minnesota, and Jim Costa of California — also voted for the rule to prevent the Yemen bill from reaching the floor, and did not respond to a request for comment.

Rep. Ken Buck, R-Colo., signed on as a co-sponsor of the legislation to wind down the war in Yemen in October. Buck was selected by GOP leadership this cycle to serve on the House Rules Committee, a powerful post that determines the fate of legislation. Curiously, Buck abstained from the House Rules Committee vote on the rule undercutting his own bill when leadership moved to combine the provision curbing the Yemen vote with the wolf legislation, and then voted in favor of the rule when it reached the floor on Wednesday. Buck also did not respond to a request for comment.

Congress never authorized U.S. support for the war in Yemen, but the American military provides backing for the bloody conflict, which has taken more than 10,000 lives and threatens more than 14 million people with imminent famine.

As the crisis worsens, human rights activists continue to urge an end to the war.

Last week, the U.S. military said it would discontinue refueling coalition warplanes bombing Yemen. But the United States continues to play a pivotal role in the war, providing U.S.-manufactured arms and logistical support to UAE and Saudi forces occupying Yemen and blockading the country’s ports.

David Segal, a co-founder of the activist group Demand Progress, said that Eshoo’s “mistaken vote was unfortunate,” but that she “should be applauded for co-sponsorship of the underlying resolution, and she will hopefully have the opportunity to vote to end our involvement in the war on Yemen through another War Powers Resolution in coming months.”

Segal, however, noted that several of the Democrats voting with the Republican majority to kill the Yemen bill this session have long supported the conflict. Green, for example, voted in 2016 to support the transfer of cluster bombs to Saudi Arabia, and has been “more complicit than the average Democrat in the decimation of Yemen,” Segal said.

Segal has long advocated on the issue. He previously served in the Rhode Island state legislature, where he pressed Textron, the defense contractor that once manufactured cluster munitions, on ending the development of the weapon.

Still, when the new class of House Democrats elected in the midterms this year takes office in January, the lead sponsors of the Yemen resolution plan to reintroduce the bill, which now has the support of much of House Democratic leadership.

The post Oops: House Democrats Mistakenly Cast Votes Blocking Resolution on Ending Yemen War appeared first on The Intercept.

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freeAgent
1 day ago
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This is the kind of nonsense that happens when you allow completely unrelated items to be tied together in a single piece of legislation.
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